MGIC Headquarters Building

 

Designed by Fitzhug Scott-Architects, Inc. of Milwaukee and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of Chicago, and completed in 1973, the four story MGIC headquarters building is constructed in a unique inverted pyramid design, with each floor extending fifteen feet out from the floor beneath. It is one of several buildings on the MGIC Plaza overlooking Red Arrow park in downtown Milwaukee. 

This photograph was a single ten second exposure, taken on a Nikon D850 at ISO 100, 24mm PC-E tilt shift lens at f/8, and processed in Capture One Pro 11 and Adobe Photoshop (removed a security camera near the roof). Using the color editor in Capture One I was able to tone down the yellow cast in the building from the lights.

Gear and software mentioned (some affiliate links):

Camera: Nikon D850
Lens: PC-E NIKKOR 24mm F3.5D ED
Tripod: 3 Legged Thing Winston
Software: Phase One Capture One Pro

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Wauwatosa, WI.
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Wauwatosa, WI.

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Wauwatosa, WI. The church was designed by Wright in 1956, and finished in 1961, about two years after Wright’s death. While departing from the traditional Byzantine architecture common in Greek Orthodox churches, Wright incorporated the domed structure and traditional colors into his design.

More information about the church is available on their website, http://www.annunciationwi.org/.

This photograph was taken well into nautical twilight, about 45 minutes after the sun set. It was taken with a Nikon D850 at ISO 100, a 24mm PC-E lens at f/5.6,  on a 3 Legged Thing Winston tripod. It is 3 exposures, 1.6, 6, and 25 seconds, and processed with Aurora HDR 2018.

Gear and software mentioned (some affiliate links):

Camera: Nikon D850
Lens: PC-E NIKKOR 24mm F3.5D ED
Tripod: 3 Legged Thing Winston
Software: Aurora HDR 2018

4-image Composite

holy-hill-composite

One use of tilt-shift lenses is creating composite images. Panoramas are pretty common, and rely on taking images with the lens shifted right and left, as well as a center image if needed, and compositing them in Photoshop or a similar program. Since the sensor plane does not move, the perspective stays very even across the image, preventing some of the weird corners and bends that a moving camera panorama can create. The disadvantage is that the shifted panoramas can not take in the 180+ degree views that moving the camera can.

This picture, taken at The Basilica of the National Shrine of Mary, Help of Christians, at Holy Hill, is my first attempt at creating a composite image from four images. The four corners are individual images that were joined in Photoshop. The lens was shifted, rotated to four of the corner stops on the lens, with a four second image taken at each stop. I processed the RAW images in Capture One, exported them as TIFFs, and composited them in Photoshop.

I think the next multi-story composite I try will be at least 5 images, with a center and 4 corners. Due to the distortion of the lens, some of the elements in the center needed some special care to get them to line up correctly.

Camera was a Nikon D100, 28mm f4 PC-Nikkor lens, processed in Capture One and Photoshop.